/ Collections

What are estate notices to creditors and how do they help with collections?

Estate notices to creditors are advertisements that alert the public about an estate being administered. The idea is that when someone dies, the lawyer or estate trustee handling their affairs needs to pay the deceased's debts before they can distribute the estate.

It's an easy collection to make if you know when one of these notices matches one of your receivables.

How it Works

In theory, creditors should be monitoring public notices to creditors to see if any of them match an outstanding claim they have. When there's a match, they can use the information from the ad to make a very easy collection.

These ads used to be published in print papers, but this is less and less common. In Ontario, these ads are predominantly posted on NoticeConnect. Creditors can subscribe for a weekly email with updates about new notices, or browse notices on the site. Click here to learn more.

Notices to Creditors vs Obituaries

Notices to creditors are distinct from obituaries or death notices in three ways.

  1. Timing - The notice might be published days, weeks, or even years after someone has died. Just because someone has passed away does not mean their estate will be administered soon, particularly if there is litigation.

  2. Claims Window - The key information in a notice to creditors is the deadline by which a creditors can come forward with their outstanding claim. This is typically 30 days from the date of the ad. If a creditor comes forward during this window, it's a very easy collection to make. If they miss it, it's much more difficult.

  3. Contact Information - These notices provide the contact information for the trustee or lawyer handling the estate, making it easy to get in touch with exactly the right person.

Free Subscription Emails

We send out emails each week with details about new notices to creditors listed on NoticeConnect. Below is an example of what these emails look like. Click here to learn more.

N2C-Email